Wapshott so far

I’m doing this summary for a bookshop called Fleeting Pages out Pittsburgh way in a shuttered Borders store, I figured I’d post it here, too.

The Wapshott Press
Est 2007
We publish books that should be published.
www.WapshottPress.com

Non-Fiction:
The Lady Actress
The Journal of Bloglandia

General Fiction:
Dr. Hackenbush Gets a Job
The Wizard’s Son
Maiden in Light
Storylandia: The Wapshott Journal of Fiction

Adult Titles:
Chase and Other Stories
The Tagger and Other Stories
The Pajama Boy
Electricland
Erotique: The Wapshott Journal of Erotica

Non-Fiction:

The Lady Actress
By Kelly S. Taylor, Ph.D.
Recovering the lost legacy of a Victorian American Superstar
www.tla.wapshottpress.com


Cover by Kelly S. Taylor

“Anna Cora Mowatt Ritchie, a mid-nineteenth century American author, public reader, playwright and actress, was a well-known and respected figure among her contemporaries in American literary and dramatic circles. Despite this, she is largely forgotten to modern theater lovers. In her day, she played to packed theaters and could number Edgar Allen Poe, David Henry Thoreau, and Ralph Waldo Emerson among her fans. Oral Interpretation scholars have called her the first “lady” elocutionist because she was the first female to enter the career of public reader without a previous career on the stage. In 1989, John Gentile, writing a history of prominent solo performers, credited her, along with famed actresses Fanny Kemble and Charlotte Cushman, with bringing to solo performance a level of prestige previously unknown in America. He claimed that they, as respectable women in a traditionally disrespected career, brought a respectability and an acceptance that allowed women of a later age to enjoy professional platform careers.1 Her brief career as a public reader inspired many imitators.”

The Journal of Bloglandia
Because some blog essays are just too cool to stay in cyberspace.
Volume 1; Issue 1
Various authors


Cover by Seth Anderson

The Journal of Bloglandia, volume 1, issue 1, is a collection of the following blog essays: On Essays by Paul M. Rodriguez, Liberal Fascism: An Interesting Moral Question by Steve Gimbel, Paint Splatters & Pixie Dust by Dan Kelly, Ten Dates of Christmas? Ten Lords A Leaping: The Gallant Mariner by Deborah Teasdale, Vanity by Susan O’Doherty, The Pillory of Hillary by Becki Jayne Harrelson, Reparation… by TJ Bryan, Richer Than The Sum Of My Skirt by Birdie C. Jaworski, The Music’s Between Us by Kathy Moseley, How to Scare People With Statistics by Tom Good, Red Lipstick by Eva Lake, Barbarella: A Woman of her Time? by Patti Martinson, An Invert’s Manifesto by Chad Denton, Roadtripping by Molly Kiely.

Volume 1; Issue 2
Various authors


Cover by Carol Colin

Blog essays: Guide for the Opera Impaired, by Madeleine Begun Kane (Mad Kane); Criticism, by Paul M. Rodriguez; Storytelling, by Anne Valente; 18 Months Into Parenthood When Plan A Was to Get Spayed ASAP , by Molly Kiely; The Doctor Is in: What We Talk about When We Talk about Fiction, by Susan O’Doherty, Don’t step back, step in…, by TJ Byran; Bon Voyage! Maybe, by Ginger Mayerson; One Woman’s Story: I Sued Rumsfeld for Sexual Harassment, by Molly Ian; Tough Cuts, by Eva Lake; The Philosophy of Librarianship: A Journey Towards Discovery , by Joshua Finnell; How the RIAA Litigation Process Works, by Ray Beckerman.

Volume 2; Issue 1
Various authors


Cover by Molly Kiely

Blog essays: Proposition 8 Postmortem – From a Senior Volunteer, by Bruce Hahne; Inspector Lohmann, Vorocracy: Final: History’s Most Lethal Parasites; The Bookmobile: Defining the Information Poor, by Joshua Finnell; There is No Right Answer, by Sara Aye; Eclecticism, by Paul Rodriguez; and True Enough, by Ray Davis.

Volume 2; Issue 2
Various authors


Cover by Raul De La Sota

Blog essays: Lost Libery Blues, by Chris Floyd; Civilizations, by Paul Rodriguez; The First Amendment and the Ambiguity of Marriage, by Steve Gimbel; The Politics of CSF: What does it mean?, by Lynn Jensen; Allergory: A Recipe, by Josh Finnell,; How To Live Your Sex Life, Early Medieval Style, by Chad Denton; On the Correct Handling of Contradictions Among the People, by Phila.

General Fiction:

Dr. Hackenbush Gets a Job
By Ginger Mayerson
Sexual Harassment and Class Warfare
www.hackenbush.net


Cover by Robin Austin

Set in 1988, Mabel Hackenbush is between gigs, her baritone ukulele smashed, and her car in the shop, she is bravely temp secretarying her way to a kinder, gentler, not to mention, solvent life until she can get back to work as a jazz standards singer.

The Wizard’s Son
By Kathryn L. Ramage
www.tws.wapshottpress.com


Cover by Michelle Mauk

Orlan Lightesblood is the son of the world’s most powerful wizard and is training to become a wizard himself. But beyond his father’s castle, he is still an innocent youth, defenseless against the evil and temptations that threaten the future laid out for him. On an alternate earth filled with wonder and danger, the wizard’s son must overcome the demons of his own past and his father’s enemies to survive to manhood.

Maiden in Light
By Kathryn L. Ramage
www.minl.wapshottpress.com


Cover by Michelle Mauk

When Laurel Windswift enters an apprenticeship under her uncle, the great wizard Lord Redmantyl, she sees only the delights that her magic can bring. But her desire for more knowledge brings her too soon into the dark secrets that all magicians of power share, and forces her to take up a wizard’s duties of night vigils against monstrous and inhuman forces before she is ready. When Laurel returns to her home city to investigate a small magical anomaly for her uncle, this maiden of light meets a child of darkness, and must undertake a task too terrible to perform.

On an alternate earth filled with wonder and danger, the wizard’s niece must make a decision that will affect the rest of her life. As she struggles with the unbearable obligations of a magician, she also faces the ostracism of the merchant families who cast her out as a child, her aunt’s matchmaking efforts, and finding an unexpected love.

Storylandia: The Wapshott Journal of Fiction
www.storylandia.wapshottpress.com
Issue 1
Various authors


Cover by Holly Troy

“Kittycat Riley’s Last Stand,” by Kelly S. Taylor; “Not Quite a Prince,” by Kathryn L. Ramage; “More Minimalist Fiction,” by Lene Taylor begin_of_the_skype_highlighting     end_of_the_skype_highlighting; “Road Kill,” by Lee Balan; “Sunday Mornings,” by Colleen Wylie; “I”, by Chad Denton; “Practice,” by Anne Valente; “Don’t Stop Thinkin’ About Tomorrow,” by Kitty Johnson

Issue 2
Various authors


Cover by Thomas Good

“Poetry and Red Phosphorus” by Kellie R. England; “Assassin” by Adam Bourke; “Escaping the Apoidians Hivault” by Christopher Husmann; “Kiva” by Cinsearae S.; and “Have You Ever Seen The Rain?” by Mylochka.

Issue 3
Various authors


Cover by William Wray

Storylandia 3, The Wapshott Journal of Fiction is pleased to present Dead Girl, Live Boy, a novella by Michelle Brooks. Dead Girl, Live Boy is an unflinching view of a haunted family landscape scattered with undetonated landmines that threaten the characters’ fragile existences. Set in a crumbling Detroit as the millennium approaches, Dead Girl, Live Boy calls to mind the works of Hubert Selby Jr. and an urban Tennessee Williams. Brooks creates a darkly comic and claustrophobic world that warrants attention. Both despairing and hopeful, her novella succeeds as both a survivor’s story and a cautionary tale.

Adult Titles:

The Tagger and Other Stories
Various authors


Cover by Robin Austin

The Pajama Boy
By Ginger Mayerson
A novel by a woman who’s been reading too much Yaoi porn


Cover by Robin Austin

Electricland
By Ginger Mayerson
There is nothing more dangerous than a woman with nothing to lose
www.electricland.wapshottpress.com


Cover by Robin Austin

Erotique: The Wapshott Journal of Erotica
Issue 1


Cover by Karl Christian

Erotica by Allison Yates, Lene Taylor, Frek Skolnik, Amy Throck*-Smythe, and Karmen Ghia

The Wapshott Press is now a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Please donate to the Wapshott Press. Thank you so much for your support. All donations are tax deductible.

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